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10 Hot and Spicy Recipes That Could Help You Live Longer

10 Hot and Spicy Recipes That Could Help You Live Longer


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Mexican, Thai, Indian — the list of popular spicy cuisines goes on and on. You may be pleased to know that the vindaloo you ate at lunch or the chicken fajitas you had for dinner may be adding years to your life.

Click here for 10 Hot and Spicy Recipes That Could Help You Live Longer slideshow.

A new study published in the British Medical Journal found that regular consumption of spicy foods is associated with a lower risk of death. The study tracked about 490,000 people in China, where spicy foods are very common. The participants were followed for a mean of 7.2 years and submitted answers to a series of questionnaires that provided details about their health, diet, and consumption of spicy foods.

The results showed that people who ate spicy foods one to two times a week had a 10 percent lower risk of death than those who rarely ate spicy foods; those who ate spicy foods three to seven times a week had a 14 percent lower risk of death. Specifically, consumption of spicy foods was correlated with a lower risk of death from health problems such as cancer, heart diseases, and respiratory diseases.

The researchers agree that more information is necessary before associating spicy foods with “total and disease specific mortality.” In the study, they wrote that the benefits of capsaicin, a molecule found in many spicy foods, “have been extensively reported in relation to anti-obesity, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and anti-hypertensive effects.”

Interested in trying hot and spicy recipes but unsure where to start? Here are some healthy and flavorful recipes for you to try.

Enlightened Spicy Avocado Dip

Put some kick into your avocado with this spicy dip. The familiar flavors of cilantro and lime are cut with a zingy wasabi punch that will keep the fire alive. Pair with whole-grain chips for the perfect healthy snack. Click here for the Enlightened Spicy Avocado Dip recipe.

Grilled Orange-Ginger Chicken Recipe

This versatile Asian marinade of orange and soy sauce with sesame seed, ginger, and crushed red pepper is great on chicken as well as flank steak and pork tenderloin. Massaging the marinade into the meat for just five minutes gives you maximum flavor without needing marinating time in the refrigerator. Click here for the Grilled Orange-Ginger Chicken recipe.


Chili Pepper Study Says They Can Help You Live Longer&mdashWhat to Know About the Health Benefits of Hot Peppers

A compound in hot peppers might also boost heart health and lower cancer odds.

If you like your peppers off-the-scale hot, here&aposs some good news. New research (to be presented at the American Heart Association&aposs Scientific Sessions 2020, which will be held virtually this week) suggests that all that heat makes you less likely to die from heart disease or cancer and more likely to live longer than your mild-pepper-loving counterparts.

The new chili pepper study analyzed more than 4,729 previous studies from five leading global health databases, which included health and dietary records of more than 570,000 people in the US, China, Iran, and Italy. They found that people who ate chili peppers had a 26% less risk of dying from heart disease, a 23% less risk of dying from cancer, and a 25% less risk of dying from any cause, compared to people who rarely or never ate chili peppers.

In an American Heart Association news release, senior author Bo Xu, MD, cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic&aposs Heart, Vascular & Thoracic Institute in Cleveland, said the researchers "were surprised to find that in these previously published studies, regular consumption of chili pepper was associated with an overall risk-reduction of all cause, CVD, and cancer mortality." Dr. Xu added that this highlights the way dietary factors may play an important role in overall health.

However, the researchers only tried to find a link between chili peppers and mortality, and didn&apost look for the exact reasons behind one. "It is impossible to conclusively say that eating more chili pepper can prolong life and reduce deaths, especially from cardiovascular factors or cancer," Dr. Xu said. "More research, especially evidence from randomized controlled studies, is needed to confirm these preliminary findings."

Previous research has found that chili peppers (of which there are many varieties, including cayenne and jalapeño) can have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and blood-glucose regulating effects. Many of the health benefits have been attributed to capsaicin, Lauren Harris-Pincus, MS, RDN, and author of The Protein-Packed Breakfast Club, tells Health. "This is the plant compound in chili peppers that we recognize as what makes them spicy," she explains. Here are some other potential health benefits of chili peppers.


Chili Pepper Study Says They Can Help You Live Longer&mdashWhat to Know About the Health Benefits of Hot Peppers

A compound in hot peppers might also boost heart health and lower cancer odds.

If you like your peppers off-the-scale hot, here&aposs some good news. New research (to be presented at the American Heart Association&aposs Scientific Sessions 2020, which will be held virtually this week) suggests that all that heat makes you less likely to die from heart disease or cancer and more likely to live longer than your mild-pepper-loving counterparts.

The new chili pepper study analyzed more than 4,729 previous studies from five leading global health databases, which included health and dietary records of more than 570,000 people in the US, China, Iran, and Italy. They found that people who ate chili peppers had a 26% less risk of dying from heart disease, a 23% less risk of dying from cancer, and a 25% less risk of dying from any cause, compared to people who rarely or never ate chili peppers.

In an American Heart Association news release, senior author Bo Xu, MD, cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic&aposs Heart, Vascular & Thoracic Institute in Cleveland, said the researchers "were surprised to find that in these previously published studies, regular consumption of chili pepper was associated with an overall risk-reduction of all cause, CVD, and cancer mortality." Dr. Xu added that this highlights the way dietary factors may play an important role in overall health.

However, the researchers only tried to find a link between chili peppers and mortality, and didn&apost look for the exact reasons behind one. "It is impossible to conclusively say that eating more chili pepper can prolong life and reduce deaths, especially from cardiovascular factors or cancer," Dr. Xu said. "More research, especially evidence from randomized controlled studies, is needed to confirm these preliminary findings."

Previous research has found that chili peppers (of which there are many varieties, including cayenne and jalapeño) can have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and blood-glucose regulating effects. Many of the health benefits have been attributed to capsaicin, Lauren Harris-Pincus, MS, RDN, and author of The Protein-Packed Breakfast Club, tells Health. "This is the plant compound in chili peppers that we recognize as what makes them spicy," she explains. Here are some other potential health benefits of chili peppers.


Chili Pepper Study Says They Can Help You Live Longer&mdashWhat to Know About the Health Benefits of Hot Peppers

A compound in hot peppers might also boost heart health and lower cancer odds.

If you like your peppers off-the-scale hot, here&aposs some good news. New research (to be presented at the American Heart Association&aposs Scientific Sessions 2020, which will be held virtually this week) suggests that all that heat makes you less likely to die from heart disease or cancer and more likely to live longer than your mild-pepper-loving counterparts.

The new chili pepper study analyzed more than 4,729 previous studies from five leading global health databases, which included health and dietary records of more than 570,000 people in the US, China, Iran, and Italy. They found that people who ate chili peppers had a 26% less risk of dying from heart disease, a 23% less risk of dying from cancer, and a 25% less risk of dying from any cause, compared to people who rarely or never ate chili peppers.

In an American Heart Association news release, senior author Bo Xu, MD, cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic&aposs Heart, Vascular & Thoracic Institute in Cleveland, said the researchers "were surprised to find that in these previously published studies, regular consumption of chili pepper was associated with an overall risk-reduction of all cause, CVD, and cancer mortality." Dr. Xu added that this highlights the way dietary factors may play an important role in overall health.

However, the researchers only tried to find a link between chili peppers and mortality, and didn&apost look for the exact reasons behind one. "It is impossible to conclusively say that eating more chili pepper can prolong life and reduce deaths, especially from cardiovascular factors or cancer," Dr. Xu said. "More research, especially evidence from randomized controlled studies, is needed to confirm these preliminary findings."

Previous research has found that chili peppers (of which there are many varieties, including cayenne and jalapeño) can have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and blood-glucose regulating effects. Many of the health benefits have been attributed to capsaicin, Lauren Harris-Pincus, MS, RDN, and author of The Protein-Packed Breakfast Club, tells Health. "This is the plant compound in chili peppers that we recognize as what makes them spicy," she explains. Here are some other potential health benefits of chili peppers.


Chili Pepper Study Says They Can Help You Live Longer&mdashWhat to Know About the Health Benefits of Hot Peppers

A compound in hot peppers might also boost heart health and lower cancer odds.

If you like your peppers off-the-scale hot, here&aposs some good news. New research (to be presented at the American Heart Association&aposs Scientific Sessions 2020, which will be held virtually this week) suggests that all that heat makes you less likely to die from heart disease or cancer and more likely to live longer than your mild-pepper-loving counterparts.

The new chili pepper study analyzed more than 4,729 previous studies from five leading global health databases, which included health and dietary records of more than 570,000 people in the US, China, Iran, and Italy. They found that people who ate chili peppers had a 26% less risk of dying from heart disease, a 23% less risk of dying from cancer, and a 25% less risk of dying from any cause, compared to people who rarely or never ate chili peppers.

In an American Heart Association news release, senior author Bo Xu, MD, cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic&aposs Heart, Vascular & Thoracic Institute in Cleveland, said the researchers "were surprised to find that in these previously published studies, regular consumption of chili pepper was associated with an overall risk-reduction of all cause, CVD, and cancer mortality." Dr. Xu added that this highlights the way dietary factors may play an important role in overall health.

However, the researchers only tried to find a link between chili peppers and mortality, and didn&apost look for the exact reasons behind one. "It is impossible to conclusively say that eating more chili pepper can prolong life and reduce deaths, especially from cardiovascular factors or cancer," Dr. Xu said. "More research, especially evidence from randomized controlled studies, is needed to confirm these preliminary findings."

Previous research has found that chili peppers (of which there are many varieties, including cayenne and jalapeño) can have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and blood-glucose regulating effects. Many of the health benefits have been attributed to capsaicin, Lauren Harris-Pincus, MS, RDN, and author of The Protein-Packed Breakfast Club, tells Health. "This is the plant compound in chili peppers that we recognize as what makes them spicy," she explains. Here are some other potential health benefits of chili peppers.


Chili Pepper Study Says They Can Help You Live Longer&mdashWhat to Know About the Health Benefits of Hot Peppers

A compound in hot peppers might also boost heart health and lower cancer odds.

If you like your peppers off-the-scale hot, here&aposs some good news. New research (to be presented at the American Heart Association&aposs Scientific Sessions 2020, which will be held virtually this week) suggests that all that heat makes you less likely to die from heart disease or cancer and more likely to live longer than your mild-pepper-loving counterparts.

The new chili pepper study analyzed more than 4,729 previous studies from five leading global health databases, which included health and dietary records of more than 570,000 people in the US, China, Iran, and Italy. They found that people who ate chili peppers had a 26% less risk of dying from heart disease, a 23% less risk of dying from cancer, and a 25% less risk of dying from any cause, compared to people who rarely or never ate chili peppers.

In an American Heart Association news release, senior author Bo Xu, MD, cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic&aposs Heart, Vascular & Thoracic Institute in Cleveland, said the researchers "were surprised to find that in these previously published studies, regular consumption of chili pepper was associated with an overall risk-reduction of all cause, CVD, and cancer mortality." Dr. Xu added that this highlights the way dietary factors may play an important role in overall health.

However, the researchers only tried to find a link between chili peppers and mortality, and didn&apost look for the exact reasons behind one. "It is impossible to conclusively say that eating more chili pepper can prolong life and reduce deaths, especially from cardiovascular factors or cancer," Dr. Xu said. "More research, especially evidence from randomized controlled studies, is needed to confirm these preliminary findings."

Previous research has found that chili peppers (of which there are many varieties, including cayenne and jalapeño) can have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and blood-glucose regulating effects. Many of the health benefits have been attributed to capsaicin, Lauren Harris-Pincus, MS, RDN, and author of The Protein-Packed Breakfast Club, tells Health. "This is the plant compound in chili peppers that we recognize as what makes them spicy," she explains. Here are some other potential health benefits of chili peppers.


Chili Pepper Study Says They Can Help You Live Longer&mdashWhat to Know About the Health Benefits of Hot Peppers

A compound in hot peppers might also boost heart health and lower cancer odds.

If you like your peppers off-the-scale hot, here&aposs some good news. New research (to be presented at the American Heart Association&aposs Scientific Sessions 2020, which will be held virtually this week) suggests that all that heat makes you less likely to die from heart disease or cancer and more likely to live longer than your mild-pepper-loving counterparts.

The new chili pepper study analyzed more than 4,729 previous studies from five leading global health databases, which included health and dietary records of more than 570,000 people in the US, China, Iran, and Italy. They found that people who ate chili peppers had a 26% less risk of dying from heart disease, a 23% less risk of dying from cancer, and a 25% less risk of dying from any cause, compared to people who rarely or never ate chili peppers.

In an American Heart Association news release, senior author Bo Xu, MD, cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic&aposs Heart, Vascular & Thoracic Institute in Cleveland, said the researchers "were surprised to find that in these previously published studies, regular consumption of chili pepper was associated with an overall risk-reduction of all cause, CVD, and cancer mortality." Dr. Xu added that this highlights the way dietary factors may play an important role in overall health.

However, the researchers only tried to find a link between chili peppers and mortality, and didn&apost look for the exact reasons behind one. "It is impossible to conclusively say that eating more chili pepper can prolong life and reduce deaths, especially from cardiovascular factors or cancer," Dr. Xu said. "More research, especially evidence from randomized controlled studies, is needed to confirm these preliminary findings."

Previous research has found that chili peppers (of which there are many varieties, including cayenne and jalapeño) can have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and blood-glucose regulating effects. Many of the health benefits have been attributed to capsaicin, Lauren Harris-Pincus, MS, RDN, and author of The Protein-Packed Breakfast Club, tells Health. "This is the plant compound in chili peppers that we recognize as what makes them spicy," she explains. Here are some other potential health benefits of chili peppers.


Chili Pepper Study Says They Can Help You Live Longer&mdashWhat to Know About the Health Benefits of Hot Peppers

A compound in hot peppers might also boost heart health and lower cancer odds.

If you like your peppers off-the-scale hot, here&aposs some good news. New research (to be presented at the American Heart Association&aposs Scientific Sessions 2020, which will be held virtually this week) suggests that all that heat makes you less likely to die from heart disease or cancer and more likely to live longer than your mild-pepper-loving counterparts.

The new chili pepper study analyzed more than 4,729 previous studies from five leading global health databases, which included health and dietary records of more than 570,000 people in the US, China, Iran, and Italy. They found that people who ate chili peppers had a 26% less risk of dying from heart disease, a 23% less risk of dying from cancer, and a 25% less risk of dying from any cause, compared to people who rarely or never ate chili peppers.

In an American Heart Association news release, senior author Bo Xu, MD, cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic&aposs Heart, Vascular & Thoracic Institute in Cleveland, said the researchers "were surprised to find that in these previously published studies, regular consumption of chili pepper was associated with an overall risk-reduction of all cause, CVD, and cancer mortality." Dr. Xu added that this highlights the way dietary factors may play an important role in overall health.

However, the researchers only tried to find a link between chili peppers and mortality, and didn&apost look for the exact reasons behind one. "It is impossible to conclusively say that eating more chili pepper can prolong life and reduce deaths, especially from cardiovascular factors or cancer," Dr. Xu said. "More research, especially evidence from randomized controlled studies, is needed to confirm these preliminary findings."

Previous research has found that chili peppers (of which there are many varieties, including cayenne and jalapeño) can have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and blood-glucose regulating effects. Many of the health benefits have been attributed to capsaicin, Lauren Harris-Pincus, MS, RDN, and author of The Protein-Packed Breakfast Club, tells Health. "This is the plant compound in chili peppers that we recognize as what makes them spicy," she explains. Here are some other potential health benefits of chili peppers.


Chili Pepper Study Says They Can Help You Live Longer&mdashWhat to Know About the Health Benefits of Hot Peppers

A compound in hot peppers might also boost heart health and lower cancer odds.

If you like your peppers off-the-scale hot, here&aposs some good news. New research (to be presented at the American Heart Association&aposs Scientific Sessions 2020, which will be held virtually this week) suggests that all that heat makes you less likely to die from heart disease or cancer and more likely to live longer than your mild-pepper-loving counterparts.

The new chili pepper study analyzed more than 4,729 previous studies from five leading global health databases, which included health and dietary records of more than 570,000 people in the US, China, Iran, and Italy. They found that people who ate chili peppers had a 26% less risk of dying from heart disease, a 23% less risk of dying from cancer, and a 25% less risk of dying from any cause, compared to people who rarely or never ate chili peppers.

In an American Heart Association news release, senior author Bo Xu, MD, cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic&aposs Heart, Vascular & Thoracic Institute in Cleveland, said the researchers "were surprised to find that in these previously published studies, regular consumption of chili pepper was associated with an overall risk-reduction of all cause, CVD, and cancer mortality." Dr. Xu added that this highlights the way dietary factors may play an important role in overall health.

However, the researchers only tried to find a link between chili peppers and mortality, and didn&apost look for the exact reasons behind one. "It is impossible to conclusively say that eating more chili pepper can prolong life and reduce deaths, especially from cardiovascular factors or cancer," Dr. Xu said. "More research, especially evidence from randomized controlled studies, is needed to confirm these preliminary findings."

Previous research has found that chili peppers (of which there are many varieties, including cayenne and jalapeño) can have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and blood-glucose regulating effects. Many of the health benefits have been attributed to capsaicin, Lauren Harris-Pincus, MS, RDN, and author of The Protein-Packed Breakfast Club, tells Health. "This is the plant compound in chili peppers that we recognize as what makes them spicy," she explains. Here are some other potential health benefits of chili peppers.


Chili Pepper Study Says They Can Help You Live Longer&mdashWhat to Know About the Health Benefits of Hot Peppers

A compound in hot peppers might also boost heart health and lower cancer odds.

If you like your peppers off-the-scale hot, here&aposs some good news. New research (to be presented at the American Heart Association&aposs Scientific Sessions 2020, which will be held virtually this week) suggests that all that heat makes you less likely to die from heart disease or cancer and more likely to live longer than your mild-pepper-loving counterparts.

The new chili pepper study analyzed more than 4,729 previous studies from five leading global health databases, which included health and dietary records of more than 570,000 people in the US, China, Iran, and Italy. They found that people who ate chili peppers had a 26% less risk of dying from heart disease, a 23% less risk of dying from cancer, and a 25% less risk of dying from any cause, compared to people who rarely or never ate chili peppers.

In an American Heart Association news release, senior author Bo Xu, MD, cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic&aposs Heart, Vascular & Thoracic Institute in Cleveland, said the researchers "were surprised to find that in these previously published studies, regular consumption of chili pepper was associated with an overall risk-reduction of all cause, CVD, and cancer mortality." Dr. Xu added that this highlights the way dietary factors may play an important role in overall health.

However, the researchers only tried to find a link between chili peppers and mortality, and didn&apost look for the exact reasons behind one. "It is impossible to conclusively say that eating more chili pepper can prolong life and reduce deaths, especially from cardiovascular factors or cancer," Dr. Xu said. "More research, especially evidence from randomized controlled studies, is needed to confirm these preliminary findings."

Previous research has found that chili peppers (of which there are many varieties, including cayenne and jalapeño) can have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and blood-glucose regulating effects. Many of the health benefits have been attributed to capsaicin, Lauren Harris-Pincus, MS, RDN, and author of The Protein-Packed Breakfast Club, tells Health. "This is the plant compound in chili peppers that we recognize as what makes them spicy," she explains. Here are some other potential health benefits of chili peppers.


Chili Pepper Study Says They Can Help You Live Longer&mdashWhat to Know About the Health Benefits of Hot Peppers

A compound in hot peppers might also boost heart health and lower cancer odds.

If you like your peppers off-the-scale hot, here&aposs some good news. New research (to be presented at the American Heart Association&aposs Scientific Sessions 2020, which will be held virtually this week) suggests that all that heat makes you less likely to die from heart disease or cancer and more likely to live longer than your mild-pepper-loving counterparts.

The new chili pepper study analyzed more than 4,729 previous studies from five leading global health databases, which included health and dietary records of more than 570,000 people in the US, China, Iran, and Italy. They found that people who ate chili peppers had a 26% less risk of dying from heart disease, a 23% less risk of dying from cancer, and a 25% less risk of dying from any cause, compared to people who rarely or never ate chili peppers.

In an American Heart Association news release, senior author Bo Xu, MD, cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic&aposs Heart, Vascular & Thoracic Institute in Cleveland, said the researchers "were surprised to find that in these previously published studies, regular consumption of chili pepper was associated with an overall risk-reduction of all cause, CVD, and cancer mortality." Dr. Xu added that this highlights the way dietary factors may play an important role in overall health.

However, the researchers only tried to find a link between chili peppers and mortality, and didn&apost look for the exact reasons behind one. "It is impossible to conclusively say that eating more chili pepper can prolong life and reduce deaths, especially from cardiovascular factors or cancer," Dr. Xu said. "More research, especially evidence from randomized controlled studies, is needed to confirm these preliminary findings."

Previous research has found that chili peppers (of which there are many varieties, including cayenne and jalapeño) can have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and blood-glucose regulating effects. Many of the health benefits have been attributed to capsaicin, Lauren Harris-Pincus, MS, RDN, and author of The Protein-Packed Breakfast Club, tells Health. "This is the plant compound in chili peppers that we recognize as what makes them spicy," she explains. Here are some other potential health benefits of chili peppers.