New recipes

A 'Thrones'-Inspired Feast


"War is coming," say the promos for April 1's premiere of HBO's Game of Thrones — which makes us hungry for medieval eats, as well as a battle. Get into the epic drama with your own medieval feast, thanks to the Unofficial Game of Thrones Cookbook. While the book won't be out until April 18, we have a sneak peek of its recipes:

Start off with a cocktail, the Tears of Lys:

• 1 lime, quartered

• 1 teaspoon simple syrup, purchased or made by dissolving 1 part sugar in 1 part warm water and cooling

• 2 ounces cachaça or white rum

(Makes 1 serving)

1. Place a lime wedge and the simple syrup in an old-fashioned glass and muddle well.

2. Add the cachaça and stir well.

3. Fill the glass with ice and stir again.

For the entrée, the Baratheon Boar Ribs with Apple: If it's good enough for King Robert, it's good enough for you.

(Serves 4)

• 1 fennel bulb, core and brown parts removed, chopped

• 1 tart apple, peeled, cored, and chopped

• ½ cup white wine

• 1 tablespoon butter

• ½ teaspoon caraway seeds

• Salt and pepper to taste

• ½ cup sour cream (optional)

• 1 tablespoon vegetable oil

• ½ cup celery, finely chopped

• 2 tablespoons onion, minced

• 1 apple, peeled, cored, and chopped

• 2 teaspoons dried rosemary or 2 tablespoons fresh, chopped

• ½ cup dry breadcrumbs or stuffing mix

• 4 double-thick boar or pork rib chops (7–8 ounces each)

• 8 wooden toothpicks, soaked in water for ½ hour

1. Cook the fennel and apple in the wine, covered, for about 20 minutes. Be sure to keep it wet by adding liquid as needed. Don’t let it dry out.

2. When the fennel and apple are very soft, add the butter, caraway seeds, salt and pepper, and sour cream. Stir lightly; then remove from heat. Set aside.

3. Heat the vegetable oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the celery, onion, apple, and rosemary. Cook about 2 minutes; then mix in the bread crumbs or stuffing mix.

4. Fill the pockets of the chops with the breadcrumb mixture, securing openings with toothpicks.

5. Set the grill to medium and brown chops over direct heat.

6. Place on indirect heat, cover, and grill for 15 minutes per side. Internal temperature should reach 145°F. Spoon some fennel sauce onto each chop before serving.

(A Word of Wisdom: You can either parboil the ribs for 20 minutes, or grill them over indirect heat for about 35 minutes before adding the sauce. Make extra and it will keep in the refrigerator for 2 weeks.)

Recipes courtesy of The Unofficial Game of Thrones Cookbook: From Direwolf Ale to Auroch Stew - More Than 150 Recipes from Westeros and Beyond (F+W Media, April 2012) by Alan Kistler


This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast

In fantasy fiction, as in real-life, food offers a window into a culture. From Sansa’s penchant for lemon cakes to King’s Landing pot-shops slinging bowls of “dubious brown,” food is integral to world building. In the Song of Ice and Fire series, George R.R. Martin goes into great detail describing both elaborate feasts and everyday meals, giving fans a lot to go on when envisioning life in Westeros.

Each region has its own distinct culinary identity: warming mulled wine, strong ales and sturdy preserved foods at the Wall fortifying roasted game and root vegetables in the North elegant cream swans and fruit tarts in the Reach grilled snake, olives and hummus in desert-like Dorne.

This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast Back to video

“Food is one way that you can really take a step into a fictional setting. Because everybody eats, whether they’re make-believe people or real-world people,” author Chelsea Monroe-Cassel says.

A Feast of Ice and Fire Photo by Bantam

Inspired by Martin’s rich culinary depictions, she and co-author Sariann Lehrer created The Inn at the Crossroads in 2011, a blog where Monroe-Cassel still shares recreations of fictional foods. In 2012, after contacting Martin, they published A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook.


This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast

In fantasy fiction, as in real-life, food offers a window into a culture. From Sansa’s penchant for lemon cakes to King’s Landing pot-shops slinging bowls of “dubious brown,” food is integral to world building. In the Song of Ice and Fire series, George R.R. Martin goes into great detail describing both elaborate feasts and everyday meals, giving fans a lot to go on when envisioning life in Westeros.

Each region has its own distinct culinary identity: warming mulled wine, strong ales and sturdy preserved foods at the Wall fortifying roasted game and root vegetables in the North elegant cream swans and fruit tarts in the Reach grilled snake, olives and hummus in desert-like Dorne.

This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast Back to video

“Food is one way that you can really take a step into a fictional setting. Because everybody eats, whether they’re make-believe people or real-world people,” author Chelsea Monroe-Cassel says.

A Feast of Ice and Fire Photo by Bantam

Inspired by Martin’s rich culinary depictions, she and co-author Sariann Lehrer created The Inn at the Crossroads in 2011, a blog where Monroe-Cassel still shares recreations of fictional foods. In 2012, after contacting Martin, they published A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook.


This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast

In fantasy fiction, as in real-life, food offers a window into a culture. From Sansa’s penchant for lemon cakes to King’s Landing pot-shops slinging bowls of “dubious brown,” food is integral to world building. In the Song of Ice and Fire series, George R.R. Martin goes into great detail describing both elaborate feasts and everyday meals, giving fans a lot to go on when envisioning life in Westeros.

Each region has its own distinct culinary identity: warming mulled wine, strong ales and sturdy preserved foods at the Wall fortifying roasted game and root vegetables in the North elegant cream swans and fruit tarts in the Reach grilled snake, olives and hummus in desert-like Dorne.

This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast Back to video

“Food is one way that you can really take a step into a fictional setting. Because everybody eats, whether they’re make-believe people or real-world people,” author Chelsea Monroe-Cassel says.

A Feast of Ice and Fire Photo by Bantam

Inspired by Martin’s rich culinary depictions, she and co-author Sariann Lehrer created The Inn at the Crossroads in 2011, a blog where Monroe-Cassel still shares recreations of fictional foods. In 2012, after contacting Martin, they published A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook.


This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast

In fantasy fiction, as in real-life, food offers a window into a culture. From Sansa’s penchant for lemon cakes to King’s Landing pot-shops slinging bowls of “dubious brown,” food is integral to world building. In the Song of Ice and Fire series, George R.R. Martin goes into great detail describing both elaborate feasts and everyday meals, giving fans a lot to go on when envisioning life in Westeros.

Each region has its own distinct culinary identity: warming mulled wine, strong ales and sturdy preserved foods at the Wall fortifying roasted game and root vegetables in the North elegant cream swans and fruit tarts in the Reach grilled snake, olives and hummus in desert-like Dorne.

This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast Back to video

“Food is one way that you can really take a step into a fictional setting. Because everybody eats, whether they’re make-believe people or real-world people,” author Chelsea Monroe-Cassel says.

A Feast of Ice and Fire Photo by Bantam

Inspired by Martin’s rich culinary depictions, she and co-author Sariann Lehrer created The Inn at the Crossroads in 2011, a blog where Monroe-Cassel still shares recreations of fictional foods. In 2012, after contacting Martin, they published A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook.


This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast

In fantasy fiction, as in real-life, food offers a window into a culture. From Sansa’s penchant for lemon cakes to King’s Landing pot-shops slinging bowls of “dubious brown,” food is integral to world building. In the Song of Ice and Fire series, George R.R. Martin goes into great detail describing both elaborate feasts and everyday meals, giving fans a lot to go on when envisioning life in Westeros.

Each region has its own distinct culinary identity: warming mulled wine, strong ales and sturdy preserved foods at the Wall fortifying roasted game and root vegetables in the North elegant cream swans and fruit tarts in the Reach grilled snake, olives and hummus in desert-like Dorne.

This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast Back to video

“Food is one way that you can really take a step into a fictional setting. Because everybody eats, whether they’re make-believe people or real-world people,” author Chelsea Monroe-Cassel says.

A Feast of Ice and Fire Photo by Bantam

Inspired by Martin’s rich culinary depictions, she and co-author Sariann Lehrer created The Inn at the Crossroads in 2011, a blog where Monroe-Cassel still shares recreations of fictional foods. In 2012, after contacting Martin, they published A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook.


This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast

In fantasy fiction, as in real-life, food offers a window into a culture. From Sansa’s penchant for lemon cakes to King’s Landing pot-shops slinging bowls of “dubious brown,” food is integral to world building. In the Song of Ice and Fire series, George R.R. Martin goes into great detail describing both elaborate feasts and everyday meals, giving fans a lot to go on when envisioning life in Westeros.

Each region has its own distinct culinary identity: warming mulled wine, strong ales and sturdy preserved foods at the Wall fortifying roasted game and root vegetables in the North elegant cream swans and fruit tarts in the Reach grilled snake, olives and hummus in desert-like Dorne.

This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast Back to video

“Food is one way that you can really take a step into a fictional setting. Because everybody eats, whether they’re make-believe people or real-world people,” author Chelsea Monroe-Cassel says.

A Feast of Ice and Fire Photo by Bantam

Inspired by Martin’s rich culinary depictions, she and co-author Sariann Lehrer created The Inn at the Crossroads in 2011, a blog where Monroe-Cassel still shares recreations of fictional foods. In 2012, after contacting Martin, they published A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook.


This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast

In fantasy fiction, as in real-life, food offers a window into a culture. From Sansa’s penchant for lemon cakes to King’s Landing pot-shops slinging bowls of “dubious brown,” food is integral to world building. In the Song of Ice and Fire series, George R.R. Martin goes into great detail describing both elaborate feasts and everyday meals, giving fans a lot to go on when envisioning life in Westeros.

Each region has its own distinct culinary identity: warming mulled wine, strong ales and sturdy preserved foods at the Wall fortifying roasted game and root vegetables in the North elegant cream swans and fruit tarts in the Reach grilled snake, olives and hummus in desert-like Dorne.

This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast Back to video

“Food is one way that you can really take a step into a fictional setting. Because everybody eats, whether they’re make-believe people or real-world people,” author Chelsea Monroe-Cassel says.

A Feast of Ice and Fire Photo by Bantam

Inspired by Martin’s rich culinary depictions, she and co-author Sariann Lehrer created The Inn at the Crossroads in 2011, a blog where Monroe-Cassel still shares recreations of fictional foods. In 2012, after contacting Martin, they published A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook.


This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast

In fantasy fiction, as in real-life, food offers a window into a culture. From Sansa’s penchant for lemon cakes to King’s Landing pot-shops slinging bowls of “dubious brown,” food is integral to world building. In the Song of Ice and Fire series, George R.R. Martin goes into great detail describing both elaborate feasts and everyday meals, giving fans a lot to go on when envisioning life in Westeros.

Each region has its own distinct culinary identity: warming mulled wine, strong ales and sturdy preserved foods at the Wall fortifying roasted game and root vegetables in the North elegant cream swans and fruit tarts in the Reach grilled snake, olives and hummus in desert-like Dorne.

This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast Back to video

“Food is one way that you can really take a step into a fictional setting. Because everybody eats, whether they’re make-believe people or real-world people,” author Chelsea Monroe-Cassel says.

A Feast of Ice and Fire Photo by Bantam

Inspired by Martin’s rich culinary depictions, she and co-author Sariann Lehrer created The Inn at the Crossroads in 2011, a blog where Monroe-Cassel still shares recreations of fictional foods. In 2012, after contacting Martin, they published A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook.


This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast

In fantasy fiction, as in real-life, food offers a window into a culture. From Sansa’s penchant for lemon cakes to King’s Landing pot-shops slinging bowls of “dubious brown,” food is integral to world building. In the Song of Ice and Fire series, George R.R. Martin goes into great detail describing both elaborate feasts and everyday meals, giving fans a lot to go on when envisioning life in Westeros.

Each region has its own distinct culinary identity: warming mulled wine, strong ales and sturdy preserved foods at the Wall fortifying roasted game and root vegetables in the North elegant cream swans and fruit tarts in the Reach grilled snake, olives and hummus in desert-like Dorne.

This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast Back to video

“Food is one way that you can really take a step into a fictional setting. Because everybody eats, whether they’re make-believe people or real-world people,” author Chelsea Monroe-Cassel says.

A Feast of Ice and Fire Photo by Bantam

Inspired by Martin’s rich culinary depictions, she and co-author Sariann Lehrer created The Inn at the Crossroads in 2011, a blog where Monroe-Cassel still shares recreations of fictional foods. In 2012, after contacting Martin, they published A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook.


This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast

In fantasy fiction, as in real-life, food offers a window into a culture. From Sansa’s penchant for lemon cakes to King’s Landing pot-shops slinging bowls of “dubious brown,” food is integral to world building. In the Song of Ice and Fire series, George R.R. Martin goes into great detail describing both elaborate feasts and everyday meals, giving fans a lot to go on when envisioning life in Westeros.

Each region has its own distinct culinary identity: warming mulled wine, strong ales and sturdy preserved foods at the Wall fortifying roasted game and root vegetables in the North elegant cream swans and fruit tarts in the Reach grilled snake, olives and hummus in desert-like Dorne.

This is how you eat like a Westerosi: Cook a Game of Thrones-inspired feast Back to video

“Food is one way that you can really take a step into a fictional setting. Because everybody eats, whether they’re make-believe people or real-world people,” author Chelsea Monroe-Cassel says.

A Feast of Ice and Fire Photo by Bantam

Inspired by Martin’s rich culinary depictions, she and co-author Sariann Lehrer created The Inn at the Crossroads in 2011, a blog where Monroe-Cassel still shares recreations of fictional foods. In 2012, after contacting Martin, they published A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook.


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